Mon.Jan 20, 2020

If You Want Customers to Say Yes, Try THIS

Beyond Philosophy

Sometimes people say no to sales offers out of habit. They have rules or expectations going into the interaction that preclude them from saying yes. There are ways to overcome these habits.

How to Design Your Perfect Customer Service Plan

CSM Magazine

In an excerpt from his book, Achieving Excellence Through Customer Service, John Tschohl provides a guide to preparing a plan for customer service success.

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25 Effective Ways to Measure and Improve Post Purchase Experience

SurveySparrow

Most businesses miss out on the big picture when they don’t have a marketing strategy on post purchase experience, that is set in stone. Your customers traverse through a myriad of emotions after they make the purchase.

What is Required for Great Customer Experiences!

Wired and Dangerous

Walk into one of your favorite service providers and you immediately feel the difference in the experience that makes this establishment one of your chosen few. What is the difference?

Training for Lead Generation, Customer Onboarding and Support

Customer lifecycle training gives customers the knowledge and tools they need to be successful. As customer success and satisfaction grows, so does retention and repeat business. This eBook can help training teams improve or expand their customer training programs.

You Must Be Padding Your Resume ‘Cause You Can’t Be That Good

Steve DiGioia

I saw this written on a resume the other day. One of her past job duties was “ Joyfully greeted guests “ My first reaction was, “What kind of B.S. is that to write? You must be padding your resume ‘cause you can’t be that good.

Travel 144

More Trending

2020 Customer Experience: 20 Wishes

ClearAction

2020 Customer Experience: 20 Wishes Lynn Hunsaker. 2020 customer experience management is at a turning point. Get ahead by making significant turns yourself now. Forces on customers and business may otherwise make some turns that leave you behind.

How Recessions Impact CX Investments

Andrew Mcfarland

When the next recession occurs, what impact will it have on customer experience initiatives? How will companies behave? The answer depends on two dimensions – corporate strength and existing customer experience (CX) capabilities. Stop investing – businesses weak along both.

THE FOUR GENERATIONS OF CUSTOMER SERVICE: THE INTERNET ERA (2/4)

Michel Falcon Experience

The internet era has HURT customer service. Find out WHY in my second installment of my four-part series that explores the best practices of “The 4 Generations of Customer Experience.”

4 Ways Fully Connected Plants Benefit Your Workforce

Lenati

Nearly 50 years ago, a few caffeine-dependent students in Carnegie Mellon’s computer science department built a light sensor and software to sense the availability of cold soft drinks in a Coke vending machine and connected it to the ARPANET, where they could see the status remotely, giving birth to the “internet of things.”. But few could have predicted how widespread the technology would become. From Fitbits and smart homes and a vacuum you can control from anywhere on the planet, the consumer internet of things has evolved into a fixture in our everyday lives. It’s only a matter of time before the internet of things transforms the industrial sector as well. Manufacturing has been slow to adopt the industrial internet of things, with some studies showing that less than 10% of manufacturers have incorporated technologies around it. Though the rollout lags behind the consumer internet of things, many industry watchers expect the industrial internet of things market to grow to $200 billion by 2021. Commonly acknowledged benefits to businesses include increased factory efficiency through intelligent automation, earlier identification of issues, and proactive management of equipment. What’s often overlooked, however, is the positive impact it can have on manufacturing workforces. Contrary to popular belief, the promise of the industrial internet of things centers on robots and artificial intelligence (AI) helping workers, not replacing them. But many leaders and workers in manufacturing and industry are unaware of the benefits of the industrial internet of things on employees’ ways of working. To capitalize on the new future of work, it’s important to innovate with human capital in mind, starting with a vision of how workers’ lives can improve with the aid of the industrial internet of things. Worker productivity. When they think of the industrial internet of things, people tend to picture lights-out factories devoid of factory floor workers. While some industrial jobs should be totally automated — such as jobs with high risk of injury or mortality rates or those in harsh work environments — the reality for most manufacturers is that the industrial internet of things will be used to enhance worker productivity, not replace it. For example, collaborative robots (cobots) are designed to be used alongside a human worker. They increase overall productivity while allowing their human counterparts to focus on higher-level job functions. Cobots are already performing rudimentary and time-consuming activities like packaging and other repetitive tasks, such as small parts assembly. They do so in the same space as human workers, often overseen by the workers who used to perform the manual tasks. By augmenting human labor, cobots increase overall productivity for both the worker and the company. Worker health and well-being. Many manufacturing processes haven’t changed much since the assembly line was invented more than 100 years ago. Even with developments in ergonomics and worker safety, manufacturing continues to be one of the top five most dangerous jobs in the country. Repetitive stress injuries alone affect 1.8 million workers each year at a cost of $20 billion. When applied in manufacturing facilities, the industrial internet of things can make workers safer. Consider the case of a German bionics company that rolled out an exoskeleton connected to the industrial internet of things to limit the strain of moving objects by strengthening worker movements. The exoskeleton used the industrial internet of things to connect to AI programs that customized operations for specific plant floor uses and the needs of each individual worker. This is just one example of a wide range of possibilities for worker safety; another could include wearables that alert supervisors to worker drowsiness, temperature fluctuations and falls. Advancement of worker roles. Because the industrial internet of things will transform how work gets done in manufacturing, workers’ roles must also change. Just as technology has advanced the role of surgeons, who up until the 19th century might have also cut your hair, the industrial internet of things is likely to transform the tasks of today’s manufacturing workers. While past manufacturing jobs were largely marked by manual labor and repetition, tomorrow’s factory floor jobs can be expected to expand to include computer programming, data science and robot monitoring or maintenance. With the rise of the industrial internet of things, manufacturing jobs will increase in complexity as well as compensation. The need for skilled workers will result in the repatriation of many of the jobs that have been outsourced abroad over the past several decades, enabling businesses to invest in their local communities. Automated maintenance. Maintenance of manufacturing machinery can be a time-consuming manual process that includes paper checklists, hefty equipment manuals and routine physical inspections. The onus is on machine operators to identify when preventive maintenance is needed and to detect emergency warning signs. Most would describe maintenance management as a painstaking necessity. Not doing it increases the risk that machines will slow production, break down and cause disruption, or even worse, injuries. Unplanned downtime alone costs manufacturers $50 billion annually. With the industrial internet of things, the need for routine maintenance doesn’t disappear; it gets smarter. By using connected machines and sensors on existing equipment together with AI (machine learning), manufacturers can predict equipment failure before it happens while reducing the negative impact on workers or the business. The industrial internet of things automates the analysis of copious amounts of data flowing in from smart machines around the plant. With AI to perform the heavy lifting of predictive analytics, operators are able to expend less time and energy on maintenance training and day-to-day operations. They can also reduce the stress associated with the need to identify early warning signs of equipment failure and troubleshoot issues remotely when they occur. The industrial internet of things doesn’t just benefit the bottom line for manufacturers. Yes, it helps with getting products to market faster while incurring less expense and downtime, but equally significant is its impact on the workers on the factory floor who make production and operations possible. The belief that industrial internet of things will mean the end of the factory worker is nothing more than a false narrative that inhibits widespread adoption. By evolving job functions through the creation of new roles and the enhancement of existing ones, the industrial internet of things is positioned to reinvent manufacturing for the better. Article first appeared at Multibriefs. To learn more about or Edge Technology offerings, please visit our Intelligence & Analytics practice page. About the Author. Tipton Loo is vice president of digital edge (AI and IoT) at PK. As the experience engineering firm, PK works with world’s most customer-obsessed companies to create pioneering experiences and accelerate outcomes. The post 4 Ways Fully Connected Plants Benefit Your Workforce appeared first on PK. Industrial Products Publications Transform Core Operations Automation IoT Manufacturing

A New Segmentation Model for Customer Onboarding

A great customer onboarding program is a proactive and meaningful way to make a lasting impact on customer engagement, retention, and expansion. In this eBook, Skilljar will show you a new framework for building a customer onboarding program, including how to segment users and drive long-term value and retention through education.

4 Ways Fully Connected Plants Benefit Your Workforce

Connective DX

Nearly 50 years ago, a few caffeine-dependent students in Carnegie Mellon’s computer science department built a light sensor and software to sense the availability of cold soft drinks in a Coke vending machine and connected it to the ARPANET, where they could see the status remotely, giving birth to the “internet of things.”. But few could have predicted how widespread the technology would become. From Fitbits and smart homes and a vacuum you can control from anywhere on the planet, the consumer internet of things has evolved into a fixture in our everyday lives. It’s only a matter of time before the internet of things transforms the industrial sector as well. Manufacturing has been slow to adopt the industrial internet of things, with some studies showing that less than 10% of manufacturers have incorporated technologies around it. Though the rollout lags behind the consumer internet of things, many industry watchers expect the industrial internet of things market to grow to $200 billion by 2021. Commonly acknowledged benefits to businesses include increased factory efficiency through intelligent automation, earlier identification of issues, and proactive management of equipment. What’s often overlooked, however, is the positive impact it can have on manufacturing workforces. Contrary to popular belief, the promise of the industrial internet of things centers on robots and artificial intelligence (AI) helping workers, not replacing them. But many leaders and workers in manufacturing and industry are unaware of the benefits of the industrial internet of things on employees’ ways of working. To capitalize on the new future of work, it’s important to innovate with human capital in mind, starting with a vision of how workers’ lives can improve with the aid of the industrial internet of things. Worker productivity. When they think of the industrial internet of things, people tend to picture lights-out factories devoid of factory floor workers. While some industrial jobs should be totally automated — such as jobs with high risk of injury or mortality rates or those in harsh work environments — the reality for most manufacturers is that the industrial internet of things will be used to enhance worker productivity, not replace it. For example, collaborative robots (cobots) are designed to be used alongside a human worker. They increase overall productivity while allowing their human counterparts to focus on higher-level job functions. Cobots are already performing rudimentary and time-consuming activities like packaging and other repetitive tasks, such as small parts assembly. They do so in the same space as human workers, often overseen by the workers who used to perform the manual tasks. By augmenting human labor, cobots increase overall productivity for both the worker and the company. Worker health and well-being. Many manufacturing processes haven’t changed much since the assembly line was invented more than 100 years ago. Even with developments in ergonomics and worker safety, manufacturing continues to be one of the top five most dangerous jobs in the country. Repetitive stress injuries alone affect 1.8 million workers each year at a cost of $20 billion. When applied in manufacturing facilities, the industrial internet of things can make workers safer. Consider the case of a German bionics company that rolled out an exoskeleton connected to the industrial internet of things to limit the strain of moving objects by strengthening worker movements. The exoskeleton used the industrial internet of things to connect to AI programs that customized operations for specific plant floor uses and the needs of each individual worker. This is just one example of a wide range of possibilities for worker safety; another could include wearables that alert supervisors to worker drowsiness, temperature fluctuations and falls. Advancement of worker roles. Because the industrial internet of things will transform how work gets done in manufacturing, workers’ roles must also change. Just as technology has advanced the role of surgeons, who up until the 19th century might have also cut your hair, the industrial internet of things is likely to transform the tasks of today’s manufacturing workers. While past manufacturing jobs were largely marked by manual labor and repetition, tomorrow’s factory floor jobs can be expected to expand to include computer programming, data science and robot monitoring or maintenance. With the rise of the industrial internet of things, manufacturing jobs will increase in complexity as well as compensation. The need for skilled workers will result in the repatriation of many of the jobs that have been outsourced abroad over the past several decades, enabling businesses to invest in their local communities. Automated maintenance. Maintenance of manufacturing machinery can be a time-consuming manual process that includes paper checklists, hefty equipment manuals and routine physical inspections. The onus is on machine operators to identify when preventive maintenance is needed and to detect emergency warning signs. Most would describe maintenance management as a painstaking necessity. Not doing it increases the risk that machines will slow production, break down and cause disruption, or even worse, injuries. Unplanned downtime alone costs manufacturers $50 billion annually. With the industrial internet of things, the need for routine maintenance doesn’t disappear; it gets smarter. By using connected machines and sensors on existing equipment together with AI (machine learning), manufacturers can predict equipment failure before it happens while reducing the negative impact on workers or the business. The industrial internet of things automates the analysis of copious amounts of data flowing in from smart machines around the plant. With AI to perform the heavy lifting of predictive analytics, operators are able to expend less time and energy on maintenance training and day-to-day operations. They can also reduce the stress associated with the need to identify early warning signs of equipment failure and troubleshoot issues remotely when they occur. The industrial internet of things doesn’t just benefit the bottom line for manufacturers. Yes, it helps with getting products to market faster while incurring less expense and downtime, but equally significant is its impact on the workers on the factory floor who make production and operations possible. The belief that industrial internet of things will mean the end of the factory worker is nothing more than a false narrative that inhibits widespread adoption. By evolving job functions through the creation of new roles and the enhancement of existing ones, the industrial internet of things is positioned to reinvent manufacturing for the better. Article first appeared at Multibriefs. To learn more about or Edge Technology offerings, please visit our Intelligence & Analytics practice page. About the Author. Tipton Loo is vice president of digital edge (AI and IoT) at PK. As the experience engineering firm, PK works with world’s most customer-obsessed companies to create pioneering experiences and accelerate outcomes. The post 4 Ways Fully Connected Plants Benefit Your Workforce appeared first on PK. Industrial Products Publications Transform Core Operations Automation IoT Manufacturing

TUESDAY TIPS BY THOMAS: Moving Averages

Dapresy

Use moving averages to transform short-term results to long-term trends with a click. In tracking surveys, a “moving average” calculation is usually applied to trend reporting.

Tips 52

Enterprise Transformation: From Digital Dinosaur to Digital Disruptor

Bizagi

Even the world’s biggest enterprises are coming under pressure to transform the way they do business. We’re all watching as innovative digital disruptors continue to shake up every industry. Traditional enterprises have become digital dinosaurs.

A First Look at 2020 Retail at NRF’s “Big Show”

Think Customers

New decade, new retail. At National Retail Federation (NRF) “Big Show” conference in New York City, business leaders defined what will make for exceptional customer experiences in 2020.

The Definitive Guide to Customer Education Metrics

As you build and scale your customer education program, the right data can help you identify patterns, make evidence-based decisions, and adapt strategy to meet business goals. In this eBook, Skilljar will share the data and metrics best practices that have helped their customers meet program goals and communicate business impact.

TUESDAY TIPS BY THOMAS: Moving Averages

Dapresy

Use moving averages to transform short-term results to long-term trends with a click. In tracking surveys, a “moving average” calculation is usually applied to trend reporting.

Tips 52

“How Good or Bad is the Service You Provide” by Ron Kaufman

Up Your Service

Transcript of “How Good or Bad is the Service You Provide”, from a keynote speech by Ron Kaufman for the SWIFT Operational Forum Asia event in Singapore. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~. How good or bad is the service you provide? Who has the answer to that question? Let’s go back to the definition.

A First Look at 2020 Retail at NRF’s “Big Show”

Think Customers

New decade, new retail. At National Retail Federation (NRF) “Big Show” conference in New York City, business leaders defined what will make for exceptional customer experiences in 2020.

How AEM Experience Fragments will empower your CX

Hero Digital

The truth is, you want your customers to experience your brand in a consistent and personalized way across all channels. And you want your brand’s content to stand out from competitors.

Your Complete Customer Engagement Handbook

Transform your contact center to build relationships with your customers that will last a lifetime.

Brands’ Meme Marketing Makes Sentiment Analysis More Important Than Ever

NetBase

Memes are always in style – at least in recent times they are! And brands are catching on to the power of these viral visuals, using memes for marketing. This makes sentiment analysis more important than ever, as not all memes are created equal, of course.

10 Phrases Good Managers Say Regularly

CSM Magazine

Here are ten statements that leaders say regularly that shows they care about their people more than their title. Good managers are different from other bosses. If you have had one lately you probably noticed they have high standards, are upbeat, knowledgeable and straight talkers.

To qualify you must comply? We take a look.

Customercount

Chances are your competitors are not as aware as they should be about regulation and legislation compliance which can often offer a competitive advantage. Continue reading → The post To qualify you must comply? We take a look. appeared first on CustomerCount.

Smile and the World Smiles With You—Unless It’s Fake

CSM Magazine

Shep Hyken reflects on the importance of a genuine smile when dealing with customers and why you should ‘hire for attitude’ One of our faithful subscribers emailed me a story. He was at a store, and the employee was friendly and engaging.

How to Create an Exceptional Customer Experience

Learn 5 actions your organization can take right now to improve the customer experience.

Integrate Live Chat & AI to Your eCommerce Business [& Learn How to Do It Right]

Win the Customer

2018 saw the eCommerce industry grow by over 25 percent with 2019 showing no signs of a slowdown for the industry. The eCommerce boom has resulted in lots of competition. Businesses need to rise to the challenge to stay relevant.

Key tech trends from NRF 2020 - and how they will impact customer experiences

MyCustomer

Engagement Tech trends from NRF 2020 and how they impact CX

How accurate is Thematic?

Thematic

In discussions with potential clients, we always hear the question, “How accurate is Thematic?”. This question usually comes up for two reasons: “I’ve been doing the analysis myself. I don’t want to compromise the accuracy when handing this task over to an automated solution.”. “I

By: 12 Best Customer Success Blogs | Customer Success Blog | Emojics

UserIQ

[…] UserIQ blog is fairly diversified as you’ll find a wide range of different article types such as news, from the experts, events, product updates, and customer success articles. You’ll find articles on customer centricity, customer success management, customer engagement, customer growth, churn management, and more. If you are a fan of precise posts, this is the blog you should follow. […

Proven Strategies to Increase Case Deflection & ROI

Speaker: Matt Laurenceau, Head of BMC Communities

Many organizations and community managers aim to provide, among other things, effective customer self service support through their online community. While this is all well and good, without taking a strategic and data-driven approach to these types of programs, success may be limited. This webinar will teach you about the strategies and programs that drive success across your community.